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20120501
20120531
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KQED (PBS) 70
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captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: syrians shouted in anger and relief, anxious to tell their stories of the weekend's horrific massacre to u.n. observers and a television team. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we go inside the town of houla with alex thomson of "independent television news," the first journalist to report from there. >> brown: then, we turn to the 2012 presidential match-up on track to be the most expensive contest ever. >> woodruff: we examine the internet virus knownwns s he flame" that may y a ae to snsnch data and eaveveroroon computer users. >> brown: in the first of two reports, paul solman assesses the true cost of student-loan debt, now topping $1 trillion. >> reporter: beth hansen has just started making loan payments: $468 a month. will she ever pay off her loans? >> i may die first. so. in which case, they would need a copy of my death certificate to finally cancel my loan. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with dolores huerta, honored with the presidential medal of
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: europe faced a potential new direction today after voters in france and greece rejected harsh austerity measures. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the weekend's elections, and what's at stake across the continent. >> brown: then we turn to the presidential contest here in the u.s., as vice president biden stirs new questions over the politics of same-sex marriage. >> ifill: spencer michaels reports on a trendy gourmet treat of the crunchy, crawly variety. >> these are huge. they're usually super abundant and very good to eat. i can put it in barbecue. >> brown: and margaret warner examines the trial of five 9-11 suspects arraigned in a military courtroom on saturday. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breathing intelligence bringing people together to bring new ideas to life. >> look, it's so simple. >> in a year, the bright minds from inside and o
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: non-white births now account for a majority of newborns in america, that according to new census numbers released today. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we assess the data and the impact on society, the economy, immigration policy and life in the u.s. >> brown: then, we have a newsmaker interview with treasury secretary timothy geithner on jobs, j.p. morgan's spectacular losses, and once again, a looming debt crisis. >> we're fighting wars, we've got a major financial crisis in europe. we have all these challenges. political politicians threatening to default if we don't adopt a partisan agenda. irresponsible. >> warner: ray suarez has the next in our daily download series. tonight, how the presidential campaigns use youtube as a cheap and effective way to get eyeballs on campaign videos. >> brown: from thailand, fred de sam lazaro reports on one man's efforts to combat hardships and instill a new way of thinking in rural regions of the southeast as
. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we assess what's behind the downward trend, and whether it's likely to continue into the summer travel season. >> woodruff: then, we update the battle for the presidency in egypt as a muslim brotherhood candidate wins a spot in the runoff elections next month. >> brown: ray suarez examines the lasting legacy of the case of the missing child etan patz. >> woodruff: miles o'brien reports on safety measures at u.s. nuclear plants, and asks are they ready for a worst-case scenario, a fukushima-like meltdown? >> the i anybodya against change and against improvement, i think it's something we have to be vigilant about and push so the regulator can make sure that change happens. >> david >> brown: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and we talk to pulitzer prize winning author stephen greenblatt about his new book, the story of the rediscovery of an ancient manuscript and its influence even today. >> one day, it is on the shelf and not instantly but decisively the world changes. >> woodruff: that's all
.1% in april, but job growth was down a little from march. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we analyze the new numbers, and assess the prospects of work for college graduates and other young people entering the job market. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez examines the apparent easing of the diplomatic crisis between beijing and washington over a blind activist, as chinese officials said today he can apply to study abroad. >> brown: margaret warner talks with author peter bergen about his new book "manhunt," a look at the long pursuit and final days of osama bin laden. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close tonight with a look at a national effort to engage young people at the local level through the music of marvin gaye and their own artistic expressions. >> brown: and we close we're like a broken down city. it's not just the economy that is causing cleveland the problem right now. it's the attitude; it's the struggle. we need to make a change. that's what i am expecting people to hear
from a bridge. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we go inside the courtroom at today's sentencing and explore the issues in a case that captured national attention. >> ifill: then, we examine a lawsuit filed by catholic leaders, institutions and schools against the obama administration for mandating birth control coverage for employees. >> brown: from our american graduate series, paul solman reports on a move to keep kids in school by teaching skills both inside and outside the classroom. >> high school dropouts here in bloomington, illinois building low income houses like those very homes behind me. is this the way to get kids back to school and into the work force? >> ifill: judy woodruff assesses the nato summit, as world leaders agree to hand over security in afghanistan by the middle of next year. >> brown: and we remember powerful german baritone dietrich fischer-dieskau. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breath
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: the chief investment officer at j.p. morgan chase retired today, the first casualty after the bank announced a $2 billion loss last week. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, margaret warner gets the latest on the trade deal gone wrong, and what comes next for the banking giant. >> brown: plus, we talk with two senators about the prospects for increased regulation: michigan democrat carl levin and tennessee republican bob corker. >> woodruff: ray suarez updates the escalating drug violence in mexico after 49 mutilated bodies were found dumped along a highway. >> brown: john merrow reports on a move to boost reading skills and shake up the content for young readers. >> reporter: the new view is that our kids read too much fiction, books like this, and not enough about things like electricity, whales and the solar system. >> woodruff: and two economists offer their prescription for addressing what they call the human disaster of long-term joblessness. >> brown: th
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: europe's economic woes worsened today, causing renewed fears amid political disarray. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the crisis as european leaders ended their summit without agreement on concrete solutions. >> brown: plus, we ask how europe's instability could affect the u.s. especially as it deals with its own fiscal crisis. >> woodruff: then, paul solman asks an age-old question: will new technology make human workers obsolete? >> there are factorys where robots do almost all of the work. >> and lights out? why is it called lights out? >> because you don't need lighting in a place run by robots. >> brown: margaret warner looks at the case against the pakistani doctor jailed for 33 years after helping the c.i.a. capture osama bin laden. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a columbia university professor's fight to prove an innocent man was executed in texas. >> there was not a sled of forensic in evidence this case, even thoug
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: the blind chinese activist now in a beijing hospital has changed his mind and wants to come to america, and he spoke by phone to congressmen in washington, saying he fears his family and friends are in danger. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the still unfolding story that's left u.s. officials struggling to resolve a tense diplomatic situation. >> brown: then, on the "daily download," we examine how the campaigns are using twitter hashtags to get out their messages. >> suarez: miles o'brien profiles a small private company trying to position itself for a big role in exploring frontiers in space. >> i'm talking about setting ultimately tens of thousands, virtually millions of people to mars and then going out there and exploring the stars. >> brown: judy woodruff talks with veteran congress-watchers thomas mann and norman ornstein, about extreme partisanship, the subject of their new book, "it's even worse than it looks." >> we've never s
's no more. so, of course, it's fearful. it's really uncertain situation. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown explores the merits of a liberal arts education with columbia university professor andrew delbanco, author of a new book called "college." >> the college classroom should be a place where students learn to speak with civility, to listen with respect to each other and, most of all, to realize that they might walk into the room in one point of view and they might walk out with another. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breathing intelligence bringing people together to bring new ideas to life. >> look, it's so simple. >> in here, the bright minds from inside and outside the company come together to work on an idea, adding to it from the road, improving it in the cloud, all in real time. >> good idea. >> it's the at&t network. providing new ways to work together, so business works better. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: social media giant facebook went public today with a high-profile ride on wall street. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the newshour tonight, we assess whether facebook and its management can live up to the hype surrounding today's stock offering. >> brown: then, ray suarez talks to u.s.a.i.d. administrator rajiv shah about a new public and private sector partnership to fight hunger in africa. >> warner: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: we have an update on the trayvon martin case after florida prosecutors release over 200 pages of photos and eyewitness accounts of the shooting of the unarmed teen. >> warner: and hari sreenivasan has a conversation with author and software developer clay johnson on managing the glut of information in this digital age. >> your clips have consequences, when you're reading an article on-line, you're not just reading that article, you're voting fors it, you're telling the editor to write more stuff like that. >> brown
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama today said definitively he now believes same-sex marriage should be legal. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we'll explore the president's evolution on the issue and talk about the debate going forward. >> brown: then, we turn to the political upset in indiana, where a tea party candidate toppled veteran senator richard lugar. >> ifill: we get new details about the would-be suicide bomber who was a double agent cooperating with the c.i.a. to foil an al-qaeda bomb plot. >> brown: from cambodia, fred de sam lazaro reports on one group's efforts to help homeless children have a brighter future. >> in make-shift gatherings like this one-part kindergarten part clinic, the children come to get cuts and scratches tended, to play board games or a rare luxury: to shampoo their hair. >> ifill: and ray suarez talks with steven lee myers of the new york times about the high-level, diplomatic drama that freed a chinese activist. >> brown: that's all ahe
'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the trade deal gone wrong, and assess whether the stumble bolsters the case for more federal regulation. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez examines a drug used to treat aids now approved by an fda panel to prevent the disease. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and margaret warner talks with prize-winning reporter leslie maitland about her powerful and personal tale told in a new book, "crossing the borders of time." >> i had to grown-up all my life fascinated, spellbound by my mother's stories of war, escape and lost love. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breathing intelligence bringing people together to bring new ideas to life. >> look, it's so simple. >> in here, the bright minds from inside and outside the company come together to work on an idea-- adding to it from the road, improving it in the cloud, all in real time.
's stalemate good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we look at the latest partisan divide over the debt ceiling and assess how the issue could play out in this year's campaign. >> woodruff: then, we examine the case against former bosnian general ratko mladic as he faces charges of genocide and ethnic cleansing at the u.n. court in the hague. >> brown: from our "american graduate" series, ray suarez has the story of an eighth grader who turns to journalism to tackle violence in his middle school. >> if i didn't have a camera i would probably be led up with the wrong people and doing the wrong stuff and i wouldn't >> woodruff: margaret warner explores the dramatic results of a new study showing paralyzed patients moving their robotic arms just by thinking. >> brown: we update the trial of john edwards, as the defense rests its case without calling the former presidential candidate or his mistress to testify. >> woodruff: and we remember mexican writer carlos fuentes, whose prolific literary career spanned more than five decades. that's all
of washington and made a surprise visit to afghanistan today. good evening. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown+ with peace. and pursuing a more hopeful fu as equal partners. to borrow words from this agreement, we are committed to seeking a future of justice, peace, security, and opportunity. and i'm confident that although our challenges are not yet behind us that the future before us is bright. >> ifill: later the president spoke to u.s. troops he plans to address the american people from afghanistan at 7:30 eastern time tonight. for more on all this, we turn to patrick quinn, kabul bureau chief for the associated press joining us now by telephone. patrick, when did you learn that a presidential visit was imminent? >> well, we only found out just shortly before he arrived. there were rumors he was coming. but it was a complete surprise, i think, to almost everybody in afghanistan that barack obama decided to come here on the anniversary of osama bin laden's death to sign this agreement. >> ifill: tell us what you can about this agreement. how significant is it? >> well, the deal is not... th
'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have the latest on this historic day, coming 15 months after the ouster of president hosni mubarak. >> ifill: then, we look at the facebook fallout as the social media giant's market debut falters out of the gate. >> brown: we have two on-the- ground reports on europe's economic troubles from spain and greece, where austerity measures are hitting home for ordinary citizens. >> ifill: we examine the iran nuclear talks in baghdad as world powers float a proposal to curb tehran's enrichment program. >> brown: and we close with the diamond anniversary of an american treasure. spencer michels has the story of building san francisco's golden gate bridge. >> it's not all celebration, a 75-year-old controversy has flared anew over who should get the credit for designing this spectacular bridge. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by
, they are discovering who they are, what they want to do, i had already known that. >> suarez: and jeffrey brown interviews a filmmaker who chronicled one wounded marine's journey from the frontlines in afghanistan to civilian life in north carolina. >> i actually brought in a lot of my own personal experiences of going to war and coming home from it and what i realized was that the fighting doesn't end when these men come back, it just continues in a different way. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breathing intelligence bringing people together to bring new ideas to life. >> look, it's so simple. >> in a year, the bright minds from inside and outside the company come together to work on an idea. adding to it from the road, improving it in the cloud, all in real time. >> good idea. >> it's the at&t network. providing new ways to work together, so business works better. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and fi
and made a surprise visit to afghanistan today. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm geoffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the president's visit and the agreement he signed with president karzai spelling out the continuing u.s. commitment after american combat troops leave. >> ifill: then our series on the aftermath of the financial crisis continues with a look at how consumers and banks have altered their spending and lending practices. >> brown: ray suarez examines a new study showing a dramatic rise in the number of babies born addicted to prescription painkillers. >> brown: and judy woodruff gets two views on how hard the u.s. should press china over human rights violations. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breathing intelligence bringing people together to bring new ideas to life. >> look, it's so simple. >> in a year, the bright minds from inside and outside the company come together to work on an idea. adding to it from the road, improving it i
'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the blind lawyer's escape, and the diplomatic dilemma his case poses for the obama administration. >> woodruff: then, we explore how apple and other tech companies take advantage of the tax code, and sidestep millions in state and federal taxes. >> ifill: ray suarez examines the debate in wisconsin over recalling the governor. is it an early test of pro and anti union power for the november elections? >> brown: judy woodruff assesses the strength and influence of al-qaeda one year after the death of osama bin laden. >> ifill: and we close with a look at the combat paper project, a program for veterans that turns uniforms into art. >> i felt like there was pressure building up and i had nowhere to turn, no outlet, and the first time i started cutting the uniform i was literally separating away, tearing away at the fibers of war. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> everybody wants to stay healthy. when i moved to the united
: and as author toni morrison is awarded the presidential medal of freedom today, jeffrey brown talks with her about her latest novel "home", set in america in the 1950s. >> there was something going on in the country, that really became the sea, and the little green shoots that became the civil rights movement, and the anti-vietnam war movement. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> growing up in arctic norway, everybody took fish oil to stay healthy. when i moved to the united states almost 30 years ago, i could not find an omega-3 fish oil that worked for me. i became inspired to bring a new definition of fish oil quality to the world. today, nordic naturals is working to fulfill our mission of bringing omega-3s to everyone, because we believe omega-3s are essential to life. >> at&t >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possib
woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we have the latest on the attack in damascus. the deadliest in the 14 month uprising. >> woodruff: then, we assess the political fallout from president obama's coming out on same sex marriage. >> brown: miles o'brien reports on the move to curb scientific testing on chimpanzees to find cures for human ailments. >> so is it cruel or not? >> woodruff: margaret warner examines new warnings about the long term use of osteoporosis drugs aimed at rebuilding bones. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer robert caro about his latest volume on lyndon johnson, an epic story of history, politics and human rivalries. >> you hate to use words like hatred as a historian but hatred is not too strong a word to describe the relationship between robert kennedy and lyndon johnson. they hated each other. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> citi turns 200 this year. in that time, there have been some good days and some difficult ones. but through it al
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: a chinese activist left the u.s. embassy in beijing today, but there are conflicting accounts on why and what will happen to him next. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the blind dissident who claimed today that chinese authorities threatened to beat his wife to death. >> brown: then, we turn to the presidential race, as the campaigns ramp up in virginia, expected to be one of several key battleground states. >> ifill: hari sreenivasan reports on the balancing act for educators who try to steer clear of politics when teaching climate science. >> the science classroom is about using fundamental principles of science. it's not about talking about policy debates. it's evidence. >> brown: ray suarez examines the shifting burden of responsibility in afghanistan after president obama signed a pact heralding a new era of partnership between the two nations. >> ifill: and judy woodruff talks with gerda weissmann klein about how her horrifying years
my time. there was no one as creative as long as james brown was. he grew up incredibly poor in the south. he grew up in his aunt honey's house of ill repute. soldiers would toss coins as they saw him dance, and that was a place where the stage to give you a sense of mastery and get a feeling of love that he did not get anywhere else. ♪ ♪ man, man, man ♪ >> he could read an audience and understand what an audience were emotionally feeling faster than they could. ♪ ♪ please, please, please >> brown could be crawling across the stage singing "please, please, please" and checking on their reaction. ♪ ♪ i love you so >> what made him sensational first of all was an incredible band. and then there is the groove, the feeling. he played songs. it got broken down. repetition was most important. baby ♪ \, baby, baby, >> there was the noise, the screen, the shout. it comes from the american church, from the blues, and james brown put that at the core of his presentation. right now, there is no one to compare james brown to in terms of being the full bodied, 360- degree
of the year. >> after the deficit soars to $16 billion, there's plenty of pain in governor brown's may budget revision with more cuts to help service and welfare programs and reduce pay. >>> term limits are back on the ballot. proposition 28 would change california's strict limits by reducing time in the state legislature from 14 years to 12 but allow all of that time to be served in one house. >>> why does the delta matter? there's renewed talk about a canal. >> in case you haven't heard, one of the world's most popular land marks is turning 75. we'll go behind the scenes of a public art exhibition guaranteed to make you look at the golden gate bridge at a whole new light. >> coming up next. >> belva: good evening. i'm belva davis. welcome to this week in northern california. joining me tonight on our news panel are lauren sommer from kqed's quest serious. and marisa lagos san francisco chronicle staff writer. and josh richman. bay area news political reporter. josh, is it my imagination but this seems to be one of the most brutal budgets governor brown has put before the legislature and us
biography, he was also deeply troubled individual. the life and music of james brown's sheds light on the musical genius by examining his complicated life. we hear now from the author of the book. >> my book is titled "the one." it was the secret to his music and his being. he hit the first beet harvest. -- he had the first beat the hardest. >> ♪ popped in got a brand new bag -- popped up -- papa got a brand new bag ♪ >> james brown is the most fascinating artist in my lifetime. i cannot think of anybody who ever was as complicated and creative as james brown was. he grew up incredibly poor in the south. housew up in his aunt's of ill repute. he raised himself on the streets of georgia. as a boy, soldiers would toss coins as he sang and danced. he learned from that kind of experience that a stage was an environment where you could gain a sense of mastery and get a feeling of love he did not have any other place. ♪ it would not be nothing without a woman or a girl ♪ >> he could read an audience and understand what people were feeling faster than they could. he could be crawl
, remembering writer and artist, maurice sendak. he died earlier today after suffering a stroke. jeffrey brown talked with him in 2002. sendak is the author of scores of books, including "where the wild things are." their conversation began with sendak discussing the challenges of creating books with pictures for readers of all ages. >> very difficult form. it is like balancing pictures with words. it is rhythm. it is syncopation. it is where you stop writing and start drawing. it is a continuous thread: words, pictures, words, pictures. it has a tempo, almost a metronome on it. why would children go into a book? so you need to pack stuff into that metronome right from the start so they syncopate with the book. you know that children hum and move when they are reading a book, turning pages, looking at pages. the timing has to be intuitive to an incredible degree. >> brown: but the key to reaching children, you're saying, is this whole interaction? not, say, the story or grabbing them with an image? it is more? >> i'm not doing this because it is designed to entice children. i don't know how to
that they brown. they said he could make sounds of joy as he was shooting people. i thought it was a question of time before i was hit, she says. dodge the moment has stuck with me. probably someone, they will never be able to answer it. >> the survivors were telling the terrifying stories. >> it is expected to give evidence throughout the week. >> no regrets is how he describes his feeling about using enhanced interrogation techniques including water boarding against suspected al qaeda members. his staunch defense of those methods and the destruction of secret videotapes showing them being used. >> water boarding is a simulated driving with the most extreme technique in the highly controversial and irrigation program designed to break detainee's. >> is not a pretty sight when you are hotter boarding. >> the techniques were tortured. they were approved at the highest level. >> he directed us to proceed. >> of the techniques were tried out on a close confidant of osama bin laden. it was rendered to a secret cia salt in thailand. >> we needed to come up with alternative techniques that would co
, and then it was only after mrs. brown, really, that i really got film scripts at all and then, you know, if you work with people like kevin spacy, and people, you know, you learn about it, and i never want to be there when i don't. >> rose: you have one more bond coming out, don't you? >> yes, yes. >> rose: at least one. >> did you believe -- we have. >> rose: yes. are you excited about the jubilee, the diamond jubilee? because you have a couple of -- >> well, i it will be a good old day of celebration, i hope, and i think they are planning lots of things, not least of which the -- on the river, with 1,000 boats going up the thames, that should be spectacular. >> rose: i want to come back to all of that, that whole thing about acting because so many people have said such wonderful things about you, i want you zero just to take one, one of your fellow actors in this film, this is bill and i talking about you, here it is. dane judi dench. >> yes. >> rose: what does she have? >> well, she has something, dane judi dench has something that is inexpressionable there are books written about how she a chief
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)

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